About Metastatic Cancer

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Metastatic cancer is cancer that has spread from the place where it first started to another place in the body. Cancer cells can travel through the lymph system to other organs or in the bloodstream to other parts of the body. Metastatic cancer has the same name and the same type of cancer cells as the original, or primary, cancer. For example, breast cancer that spreads to the lung and forms a metastatic tumor is metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer. Some of the most treated areas for metastatic cancer include:

 

Metastatic Bone Cancer –

Bones are a common site for metastases, which occur when cancer cells from a primary cancer spread to the bone. Metastases can form small holes in the affected bone, which weaken the bone and increase the risk of fractures and other issues. Prostate, breast, and lung cancers are the most common sources of bone metastases, though almost any cancer has the ability to spread to the bones.

 

Metastatic Brain Cancer –

The most common sources of metastases in the brain include lung, breast, and skin cancers, though almost any cancer has the ability to spread to the brain. Metastatic brain cancer is a mass of cells (tumor) that originated in another body organ and has spread into the brain tissue. Metastatic tumors in the brain are more common than primary brain tumors. Although chemotherapy is not effective for treating metastatic brain tumors, radiosurgery is.

 

Metastatic Liver Cancer –

Liver metastases develop when a cancerous tumor from another part of the body spreads to the liver through the bloodstream. Common sources of metastases in the liver include colorectal, breast, esophageal, lung, pancreatic, and stomach cancer, though almost any cancer has the ability to spread to the liver.

 

 

 

 Metastatic Lung Cancer –

Lung metastases develop from cancer cells that spread from another cancerous tumor in the body, usually through the bloodstream or through the lymphatic system. Bladder, breast, colon, kidney, and prostate cancer can be the source of the metastatic lesion/tumor in the lung, though almost any cancer has the ability to spread to the lung.